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Geography
Topography
Climate
Flora and Fauna

Geography of Georgia

Georgia is situated in Southwestern Asia, bordering the Black Sea, between Turkey and Russia. Located in the region known as the Caucasus or Caucasia, Georgia is a small country of approximately 69,875 square kilometers--about the size of West Virginia. To the north and northeast, Georgia borders the Russian republics of Chechnya, Ingushetia, and North Ossetia (all of which began to seek autonomy from Russia in 1992). Neighbors to the south are Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Turkey. The shoreline of the Black Sea constitutes Georgia's entire western border.

Georgia is located in wrinkled Alpine zone, in Subtropical zones of northern periphery.

The geological constitution is characterized by the precipitation is basically of Mesozoic and Cainozoic era. According to the wrinkles it's divided by several Geotectonical units: from North to the South by Caucasian main ring's Antiklinorium, main Caucasian range, wrinkles system, Georgian Belt, Achara-Trialeti system, Artvin-Bolnisi Belt and Loc-Karabag's wrinkled zone.

Geographic coordinates: 42°00′N, 43°30′E

Map of Georgia

 


Geography of Georgia

Beginning in the 1980s, Black Sea pollution has greatly harmed Georgia's tourist industry. Inadequate sewage treatment is the main cause of that condition. In Batumi, for example, only 18 percent of wastewater is treated before release into the sea. An estimated 70 percent of surface water contains health-endangering bacteria to which Georgia's high rate of intestinal disease is attributed.

The war in Abkhazia did substantial damage to the ecological habitats unique to that region. In other respects, experts considered Georgia's environmental problems less serious than those of more industrialized former Soviet republics. Solving Georgia's environmental problems was not a high priority of the national government in the post-Soviet years, however; in 1993 the minister for protection of the environment resigned to protest this inactivity. In January 1994, the Cabinet of Ministers announced a new, interdepartmental environmental monitoring system to centralize separate programs under the direction of the Ministry of Protection of the Environment. The system would include a central environmental and information and research agency. The Green Party used its small contingent in the parliament to press environmental issues in 1993.

Natural hazards: earthquakes

Environment - current issues: air pollution, particularly in Rust'avi; heavy pollution of Mtkvari River and the Black Sea; inadequate supplies of potable water; soil pollution from toxic chemicals

Environment - international agreements:
party to: Air Pollution, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Ozone Layer Protection, Ship Pollution, Wetlands
signed, but not ratified: none of the selected agreements

 


Area and boundaries

Area:
total: 69,700 km²
land: 69,700 km²
water: 0 km²

Area - comparative: slightly smaller than South Carolina (US) or Benelux (EU)

Land boundaries:
total: 1,461 km
border countries: Armenia 164 km, Azerbaijan 322 km, Russia 723 km, Turkey 252 km

Coastline: 310 km

Maritime claims: NA

Elevation extremes:
lowest point: Black Sea 0 m
highest point: Mt'a Shkhara 5,201 m (peak is not in Georgia)
Mt'a Mq'invartsveri (Gora Kazbeg) at 5,048 m is the highest peak in Georgia.

 


Resources and land use

Natural resources: forests, hydropower, manganese deposits, iron ore, copper, minor coal and petroleum deposits; coastal climate and soils allow for important tea and citrus growth

Land use:
arable land: 9%
permanent crops: 4%
permanent pastures: 25%
forests and woodland: 34%
other: 28% (1993 est.)

Irrigated land: 4,000 km² (1993 est.)

 

Based on: Wikipedia - Geography of Georgia

If you have further information...
We have collected here quite a bit of information about Georgia, but we are looking for more. If you have information about this section that you think may be of interest to researchers, please send us the information using the Submission Form.

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Page last update: 25 May, 2006